Area Lakes
HORDS CREEK LAKE

Hords Creek Lake is on Hords Creek-part of the Colorado River basin-five miles northwest of Valera in western Coleman County (at 3150' N, 9934' W). The 6,800-foot-long earthfill dam, built by List and Clark Construction Company, was started in February 1947 and completed in June 1948; deliberate impoundment of water began in April 1948. The cost of the project was nearly $3 million. In 1967 the reservoir had a conservation capacity of 8,640 acre-feet and a surface area of 510 acres at an elevation of 1,900 feet above mean sea level. Capacity at the crest of the emergency spillway was 25,310 acre-feet. The drainage area above the dam was forty-eight square miles. The lake, which is jointly owned by the city of Coleman and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, is used for flood control and as a municipal water supply.

  • Location:
    On Hords Creek in Coleman County, 63 miles south of Abilene and about 10 mIles west of Coleman

  • Size:
    510 acres

  • Maximum Depth:
    39 feet

  • Date Impounded:
    1948

  • Normal Water Clarity:
    Slightly stained to clear with visibility up to 4 feet

  • Water Level Fluctuation:
    Moderate, sometimes prone to long periods with dropping water levels

  • Conservation Pool Elevation:
    1,900 ft. msl

  • Aquatic Vegetation:
    Floating-leaf pondweed and water willow

  • Predominant Fish Species:
    Largemouth bass, white crappie, channel catfish, flathead catfish, sunfish

ACCESS/CAMPING
Hords Creek Lake offers excellent camping, picnic and fishing facilities, including handicap fishing access. Fees are required to launch a boat. All major coves have speed limit restrictions so anglers can better enjoy sportfishing. Shore fishing access is excellent: in addition to three fishing piers, almost the entire shoreline is open to bank anglers. There are fish-cleaning stations, swimming beaches, and group camping facilities. No marina or boat rental facilities are located on the lake. A bait shop on US 153 is open March through September.

MAPS
A contour map is available from the US Army Corps of Engineers, (325) 625-2322.

FISHING REGULATIONS
All species are currently managed with statewide regulations. Anglers are reminded to consult the current fishing regulation booklet to verify these regulations are still in effect.

ANGLING OPPORTUNITIES

SpeciesPoorFairGoodExcellent
Largemouth Bass  
Catfish
Crappie
Sunfish
The reservoir is known for its largemouth bass fishing, but populations of flathead catfish and sunfish should not be overlooked. Florida largemouth bass were introduced in 1986.

FISHING COVER/STRUCTURE
A variety of cover and structure is scattered throughout the reservoir including some aquatic vegetation, dead submerged brush, black willow trees, rocky ledges and points, a rip-rap dam, and several well-defined creek channels. When the reservoir is low, fishing cover is primarily restricted to rocky structure and some brush.

FISHING TIPS AND TACTICS
Largemouth bass fishing is often very good, especially in the spring. Jigs and crankbaits are good in the early spring and late winter. As water warms, suspending jerkbaits and floating worms, buzzbaits, and spinnerbaits become productive. Trotlines baited along creek channels and steep, rocky banks are effective for flathead catfish. For kids seeking sunfish, small pieces of night crawlers and mealworms fished with #6 cricket hooks under a cork or on the bottom can be a lot of fun.



O. H. IVIE RESERVOIR

The O. H. Ivie Reservoir, once called Stacy Reservoir, is impounded by the S. W. Freese Dam at the Concho-Coleman county line. It is located in Concho, Coleman, and Runnels counties. In 1938 the United States Army Corps of Engineers expressed a desire for a reservoir site near the confluence of the Concho and Colorado rivers. An agreement was finally reached in 1985, when the Texas Water Commissionqv granted permission to impound 554,000 acre-feet of water on the Colorado River at Stacy, sixteen miles below the confluence. The project was delayed by negotiations to preserve the endangered Concho water snakes, and to relocate several local family cemeteries. The reservoir was to be named for the Stacy settlement, but it was later decided instead to honor the water district's general manager, O. H. Ivie, and to name the dam for Simon W. Freese,qv a Fort Worth engineer whose firm had worked on major reservoir projects since 1949. The lake waters are used for domestic and municipal water supply for a number of West Texas cities and towns. The conservation surface area of the lake is 20,000 surface acres. The reservoir and its two-mile rolled earthfill dam, constructed by Brown and Root USA, were dedicated in 1990 and are owned and operated by the Colorado River Municipal Water District.qv The lake drains an area of 3,300 square miles and has a pool elevation of 1,551 feet. The reservoir is surrounded by a recreation area.

  • Location:
    On the Colorado and Concho Rivers in Concho, Coleman, and Runnels counties, 55 miles east of San Angelo

  • Size:
    19,200 acres

  • Maximum Depth:
    119 feet

  • Date Impounded:
    1990

  • Normal Water Clarity:
    Clear in the main lake and Concho arm, turbid in the Colorado arm

  • Water Level Fluctuation:
    6-10 feet annually

  • Conservation Pool Elevation:
    1551.5 ft. msl

  • Aquatic Vegetation:
    Sago and American pondweed, marine naiad, and hydrilla

  • Predominant Fish Species:
    Largemouth, smallmouth, and white basses, sunfish, white and black crappie, and channel, blue and flathead catfishes

ACCESS/CAMPING
Five paved boat ramps offer boat access, depending on water levels. Access fees are $2 per person aged 17-65. Annual permits are available from the CRMWD. Camping is available for a fee at three recreation areas. The nearest state parks are San Angelo State Park to the west and Lake Brownwood State Park to the east.

MAPS
Free maps showing recreation areas are available from the CRMWD and from marinas and businesses that sell access permits. More detailed lake maps may be available at sporting goods and tackle stores.

FISHING REGULATIONS
Statewide fishing regulations apply for all species with the exceptions of largemouth and smallmouth bass. The minimum length limit for smallmouth bass is 18 inches. For largemouth bass, there is no minimum length, but anglers can keep only 2 per day that measure less than 18 inches. The daily bag limit for all black bass species combined is 5 per day, of which only 3 may be smallmouth bass.

ANGLING OPPORTUNITIES

SpeciesPoorFairGoodExcellent
Largemouth Bass  
Smallmouth Bass
Catfish
Crappie
White Bass
Sunfish


FISHING COVER/STRUCTURE
Cover in the reservoir is primarily standing timber. The trees and brush were not cleared from the reservoir basin before the lake was impounded, so there are thousands of acres of flooded mesquite, oak, and juniper trees in all parts of the reservoir. Native vegetation and hydrilla occurs in the main part of the lake and is spreading up the Colorado River and Concho River arms. The structure in the main part of the reservoir is mostly rock. In the river arms it is mostly mud flats.

FISHING TIPS AND TACTICS
Largemouth bass are caught using live bait and artificial baits around the aquatic vegetation and standing timber. Also, many trophy-sized fish are caught on Carolina-rigged plastic worms, minnows and water dogs fished off deep (20+ feet) humps and drop-offs. Catfish are caught all over the reservoir using live and cut baits. Crappie fishing is usually best at night. Most white bass fishing is done by trolling crank baits in the main part of the reservoir near the dam.



LAKE COLEMAN
  • Location:
    On Jim Ned Creek in Coleman County, 45 miles southeast of Abilene and about 13 miles north of Coleman

  • Size:
    2,000 acres

  • Maximum Depth:
    48 feet

  • Date Impounded:
    1966

  • Normal Water Clarity:
    Clear to stained, with visibility up to 4 feet

  • Water Level Fluctuation:
    Average 3 feet annually, but lake may have prolonged periods with dropping water levels

  • Conservation Pool Elevation:
    1717.5 ft. msl

  • Aquatic Vegetation:
    Water willow and star grass when the lake is full

  • Predominant Fish Species:
    Largemouth bass, white crappie, hybrid striped bass, channel catfish, flathead catfish

ACCESS/CAMPING
There are three boat ramps on Lake Coleman. The two main boat ramps are located at the south end of the FM 1274 bridge in Press Morris Park. Primitive and improved camping facilities and picnic sites are available. Shore access is excellent around the camping areas. A marina and bait store are open from late spring through late summer. There are no boat rentals and no handicap-accessible fishing.

MAPS
A contour map is available from the TPWD Inland Fisheries office, 5325 N. 3rd, Abilene Texas 79603, (915) 692-0921,

FISHING REGULATIONS
All species are currently managed with statewide regulations. Anglers are reminded to consult the current fishing regulation booklet to verify these regulations are still in effect.

ANGLING OPPORTUNITIES

SpeciesPoorFairGoodExcellent
Largemouth Bass
Catfish
Crappie
White Bass
Sunfish

Largemouth bass, hybrid striped bass, and flathead catfish fishing are rated good to excellent on this lake. Florida bass were introduced in 1985.

FISHING COVER/STRUCTURE
Lake Coleman has a rocky shoreline with numerous points and ledges. Standing timber is abundant in the upper half of the reservoir. Black willow trees, brush, and boat docks round out the primary cover and structure at Lake Coleman

FISHING TIPS AND TACTICS
Lake Coleman is well known for hybrid striped bass fishing, especially during the summer and early fall when hybrids roam in large schools and feed on the surface. Fast moving lures and topwater baits work well. Downrigging and drift fishing with live shad or sunfish are also very effective for hybrids in this reservoir. Largemouth bass fishing is best from September through May. Lake Coleman is an excellent topwater lake for these bass. Spinnerbaits, crankbaits, plastic worm, jigs, and jerkbaits are also effective. Jerkbaits and floating worms are hard to beat from March through May, with a general shift from jerkbaits to floating worms as the water warms. Buzzbaits are most productive in the fall. Trotline anglers do very well for flathead catfish, especially in the upper end.

Coleman County Chamber of Commerce,
Agriculture and Tourist Bureau

218 Commercial Avenue
Coleman, Texas 76834
Phone
325-625-2163
Fax
325-625-2164
Email
 chamber@colemantexas.org